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  #21  
Old January 24th, 2005, 10:39 AM
Terry Kreft
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A. People who complain about top/bottom posting instead of learning how to
scroll g.


--
Terry Kreft
MVP Microsoft Access


"Trevor Best" wrote in message
...
David Schofield wrote:
What's top posting?
David


:-)

A: Top-Posting
Q: What's the most annoying thing on usenet?

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  #22  
Old January 24th, 2005, 01:09 PM
Lyn
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This may be straying from the original topic (but then who hasn't in this
thread :-), but I have a serious question. Like David, I didn't understand
the reference to "top posting". Nor Trevor's response -- at first (but I
got it eventually :-).

I have noted in this and other NGs that some people respond above the
previous post(s), some below. And of course with long and complex posts, it
makes sense to embed parts of the response next to the relevant parts of the
previous post. But apart from that the comments in this thread suggest that
there is a preference among the gurus for responses at the bottom of the
previous posts rather than on top. Is my understanding of this correct? Is
there general agreement on this?

I must admit that I have been guilty (if that is the word) of "top posting".
It has always seemed to me that when reading a thread you don't want to have
to wade through all the previous postings over and over again to get to the
gem of new information at the bottom. But maybe I have been wrong about
this.

Of course another issue is: how long do you keep adding to all the previous
posts in a long thread -- at what point do you snip off the older posts to
keep the new post length manageable? Is there (or should there be) a rule
that you keep the last "n" posts and progressively delete older posts than
that? Or should this be done on a case-by-case basis in order to ensure
that the context of the subject matter remains clear, without requiring
readers to have to dig into old posts to make sense of the latest post?

In other words, is there an agreed netiquette on replying to posts in regard
to top/bottom posting and snipping early posts to avoid bloat? If so, what
is it?

--
Cheers,
Lyn.

"Terry Kreft" wrote in message
...
A. People who complain about top/bottom posting instead of learning how to
scroll g.


--
Terry Kreft
MVP Microsoft Access


"Trevor Best" wrote in message
...
David Schofield wrote:
What's top posting?
David


:-)

A: Top-Posting
Q: What's the most annoying thing on usenet?

--
This sig left intentionally blank





  #23  
Old January 24th, 2005, 03:03 PM
Terry Kreft
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Lyn,
People can get quite vehement about top and bottom posting.

Essentially theadvantage of consistent bottom posting is that you can read
through the posts in sequence.

The advantage of top posting is that when you use a preview pane the
previewed content tends to be the last post.

On the subject of trimming, you should really trim previous posts to what is
relevant to your post, in the past people could get quite nasty about not
trimming posts, this has become less of an issue though since the advent of
fast internet links and large storage space.

Personally I'm a rabid top-poster and trim when I remember to do so,
speaking of which

--
Terry Kreft
MVP Microsoft Access


"Lyn" wrote in message
...
This may be straying from the original topic (but then who hasn't in this
thread :-), but I have a serious question. Like David, I didn't

understand
the reference to "top posting". Nor Trevor's response -- at first (but I
got it eventually :-).

I have noted in this and other NGs that some people respond above the
previous post(s), some below. And of course with long and complex posts,

it
SNIP
Is there general agreement on this?

SNIP
Of course another issue is: how long do you keep adding to all the

previous
posts in a long thread --

SNIP
In other words, is there an agreed netiquette on replying to posts in

regard
to top/bottom posting and snipping early posts to avoid bloat? If so,

what
is it?

--
Cheers,
Lyn.

"Terry Kreft" wrote in message
...
A. People who complain about top/bottom posting instead of learning how

to
scroll g.


--
Terry Kreft
MVP Microsoft Access


"Trevor Best" wrote in message
...
David Schofield wrote:
What's top posting?
David

:-)

A: Top-Posting
Q: What's the most annoying thing on usenet?

--
This sig left intentionally blank







  #24  
Old January 24th, 2005, 07:35 PM
John Vinson
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On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 23:09:33 +1100, "Lyn"
wrote:

In other words, is there an agreed netiquette on replying to posts in regard
to top/bottom posting and snipping early posts to avoid bloat? If so, what
is it?


This argument has been going on as long as Usenet has existed. It
sometimes attains the intensity of a religious war. Most old Usenet
hands prefer (with varying degrees of vehemence) bottom posting in
order to maintain chronological order within a message; many other
folks prefer top posting, for one because many newsreaders (including
the widely used Outlook Express) default to set the cursor there, and
for the reason you cite: being able to see the reply without scrolling
down.

There's no answer that will satisfy everyone, and there are vehement
opinions both ways.

Personally, I try to trim and either bottom post or interpost, but
depending on the situation, I'll sometimes just do a quick toppost.
I'm therefore despised and denigrated by the fanatics in both camps.
g


John W. Vinson[MVP]
  #25  
Old January 24th, 2005, 07:53 PM
rkc
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Terry Kreft wrote:

People can get quite vehement about top and bottom posting.


What about eliminating newsgroups from a multi-posted article
when replying?
  #26  
Old January 24th, 2005, 08:01 PM
Rick Brandt
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rkc wrote:
Terry Kreft wrote:

People can get quite vehement about top and bottom posting.


What about eliminating newsgroups from a multi-posted article
when replying?


Crossposting is only frowned upon when the number of groups is excessive.
As this one only has four groups I would say it's fine (albeit at the high
end of fine).

--
I don't check the Email account attached
to this message. Send instead to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com


  #27  
Old January 24th, 2005, 08:25 PM
rkc
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Default

Rick Brandt wrote:
rkc wrote:

Terry Kreft wrote:


People can get quite vehement about top and bottom posting.


What about eliminating newsgroups from a multi-posted article
when replying?



Crossposting is only frowned upon when the number of groups is excessive.
As this one only has four groups I would say it's fine (albeit at the high
end of fine).


O.K. I asked that wrong. Is it bad form to remove newsgroups from a
cross-posted article when replying to it. I tend to remove the
groups I don't read.




  #28  
Old January 24th, 2005, 08:27 PM
Noozer
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O.K. I asked that wrong. Is it bad form to remove newsgroups from a
cross-posted article when replying to it. I tend to remove the
groups I don't read.


Remove any group you like. A person should be watching any group they post
to.



  #29  
Old January 24th, 2005, 08:29 PM
Trevor Best
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Default

Terry Kreft wrote:
Lyn,
People can get quite vehement about top and bottom posting.

Essentially theadvantage of consistent bottom posting is that you can read
through the posts in sequence.

The advantage of top posting is that when you use a preview pane the
previewed content tends to be the last post.


Lazybones :-)

On the subject of trimming, you should really trim previous posts to what is
relevant to your post, in the past people could get quite nasty about not
trimming posts, this has become less of an issue though since the advent of
fast internet links and large storage space.


Now it's the people who normally smite the non-snippers getting lazy :-)

Personally I'm a rabid top-poster and trim when I remember to do so,
speaking of which


On the subject of the vehement discussions (negotiations with a light
sabre? g) I don't usually smite top posters but if ask my opinion I
give it :-)

Well, at least your sig sep works so your quoted post was automatically
snipped :-)

I also hate people who end every paragraph with a smiley :-)

--
This sig left intentionally blank
  #30  
Old January 24th, 2005, 08:29 PM
Rob Oldfield
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Default

"John Vinson" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 24 Jan 2005 23:09:33 +1100, "Lyn"
wrote:

In other words, is there an agreed netiquette on replying to posts in

regard
to top/bottom posting and snipping early posts to avoid bloat? If so,

what
is it?


This argument has been going on as long as Usenet has existed. It
sometimes attains the intensity of a religious war. Most old Usenet
hands prefer (with varying degrees of vehemence) bottom posting in
order to maintain chronological order within a message; many other


Personally speaking..... I'm all for compromise.

folks prefer top posting, for one because many newsreaders (including
the widely used Outlook Express) default to set the cursor there, and
for the reason you cite: being able to see the reply without scrolling
down.

There's no answer that will satisfy everyone, and there are vehement
opinions both ways.

Personally, I try to trim and either bottom post or interpost, but
depending on the situation, I'll sometimes just do a quick toppost.
I'm therefore despised and denigrated by the fanatics in both camps.
g


John W. Vinson[MVP]



 




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