A Microsoft Office (Excel, Word) forum. OfficeFrustration

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » OfficeFrustration forum » Microsoft Access » Database Design
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read  

How to enforce subtypes/supertypes in Access 2000?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old August 10th, 2006, 11:20 PM posted to microsoft.public.access.tablesdbdesign
Graham Mandeno
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 593
Default How to enforce subtypes/supertypes in Access 2000?

It sounds like you're using Access 2000, which does not have this option.
(This would also explain why your VBA references were set to ADO by default,
and not DAO)

You don't want SQL-92 anyway, if you are working with a Jet database.
--
Cheers,

Graham Mandeno [Access MVP]
Auckland, New Zealand

"Bob" wrote in message
...
Hi Graham,

Actually I did have another question too - more out of curiosity than
anything else.

You mentioned earlier that to switch to ANSI-92 mode you need to go to
Tools
Options Tables/Queries. When I following these directions I get a
form

with a Table and a Query design section. In the Table design section, I
get options to change the default field sizes, the default field type, and
a box for "AutoIndex on Import/Create". In the Query design section, I
get checkboxes to "show table names", "output all fields" and "enable
autojoin". I also get radio buttons to "Run permissions" as "Owner's" or
"User's". But I don't see anything that refers to ANSI mode. Any ideas
why?


Regards
Bob

"Bob" wrote in message
...
Whoo Hoo!

Thanks alot Graham. It's finally working. :-)

Just one more question though, why do you prefer DAO over ADO? I've now
acquired a copy of the "Microsoft Office Access 2003 Bible" and there's a
small section in it that asserts that ADO is to be preferred over DAO
because Microsoft does not plan to provide any future enhancements for
the latter. I'm still starting out at this, so I'm not entirely clear on
the other pros and cons of each.


Regards
Bob





Ads
  #32  
Old August 11th, 2006, 01:51 AM posted to microsoft.public.access.tablesdbdesign
Bob
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 17
Default How to enforce subtypes/supertypes in Access 2000?

Hi Graham,

Yes, I run Access 2000 at home. We have access 2003 at work and I just
found the right settings on that one. I'll keep away from it anyway,
but its nice to know where the option is if I ever need it.

By the way, I think I found a slight bug in the Before_Update code you
supplied. What I have found is if I try to change the ContactType the
custom error message popups up as expected. If I then opt to delete
the existing record, everything is fine. The record is deleted and I
can still navigate the records using the record selector at the foot of
the main (Clients) form - again everything works as expected. But if I
opt to cancel the update instead, I end up getting the standard Access
message about not being able to change or delete the record (ie the one
I was getting before you came to the rescue :-) ).

I came to the conclusion that the "cboContactType.Undo" line simply
wasn't working. After looking in the help files on the "dirty" event,
I noticed this statement:

"The BeforeUpdate and AfterUpdate events for a record occur after you
have entered the new or changed data in the record and moved to another
record (or clicked Save Record on the Records menu), and therefore
AFTER the Dirty event for the record." (my emphasis)

So I focussed on the dirty event. Anyways, for the benefit of those
who might have been following this thread, I resolved the problem by
simply adding "Me.Form.Undo" in the line immediately after the existing
undo command.

These variations also worked ("Clients" is the name of my main form):

(1) Forms!Clients.Undo

(2)
If Forms("Clients").Dirty = True Then
Forms("Clients").Undo
End If

Everything seems to be fine now. Thanks again for all your help on
this issue.

Getting back to the ADO/DAO, my long term aim would be ultimately to
port my little Access program to VB.Net - purely because I'm a sucker
for punishment :-)

If I code everything using DAO now, will I need to re-code everything
into ADO later, or does VB.Net not care which one you reference?

On a different tangent, if I port everything over to VB.Net, do you
know if I will need extra licences or if I have to upgrade to a
developer edition of some sort before I can distribute my VB.Net
program with an .mdb file? Will my VB.Net or existing ms office
licences cover this sort of thing (ie distribution)? And what's the
deal with runtime files? Will they be packaged with my .mdb file if I
incorporate that into a VB.Net program?

Thanks for letting me pick your brain.


TIA
Bob



Graham Mandeno wrote:

It sounds like you're using Access 2000, which does not have this option.
(This would also explain why your VBA references were set to ADO by default,
and not DAO)

You don't want SQL-92 anyway, if you are working with a Jet database.
--
Cheers,

Graham Mandeno [Access MVP]
Auckland, New Zealand

"Bob" wrote in message
...
Hi Graham,

Actually I did have another question too - more out of curiosity than
anything else.

You mentioned earlier that to switch to ANSI-92 mode you need to go to
Tools
Options Tables/Queries. When I following these directions I get a
form

with a Table and a Query design section. In the Table design section, I
get options to change the default field sizes, the default field type, and
a box for "AutoIndex on Import/Create". In the Query design section, I
get checkboxes to "show table names", "output all fields" and "enable
autojoin". I also get radio buttons to "Run permissions" as "Owner's" or
"User's". But I don't see anything that refers to ANSI mode. Any ideas
why?


Regards
Bob

"Bob" wrote in message
...
Whoo Hoo!

Thanks alot Graham. It's finally working. :-)

Just one more question though, why do you prefer DAO over ADO? I've now
acquired a copy of the "Microsoft Office Access 2003 Bible" and there's a
small section in it that asserts that ADO is to be preferred over DAO
because Microsoft does not plan to provide any future enhancements for
the latter. I'm still starting out at this, so I'm not entirely clear on
the other pros and cons of each.


Regards
Bob




  #33  
Old August 12th, 2006, 05:17 AM posted to microsoft.public.access.tablesdbdesign
Graham Mandeno
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 593
Default How to enforce subtypes/supertypes in Access 2000?

Hi Bob

Answers inline...

By the way, I think I found a slight bug in the Before_Update code you
supplied. What I have found is if I try to change the ContactType the
custom error message popups up as expected. If I then opt to delete
the existing record, everything is fine. The record is deleted and I
can still navigate the records using the record selector at the foot of
the main (Clients) form - again everything works as expected. But if I
opt to cancel the update instead, I end up getting the standard Access
message about not being able to change or delete the record (ie the one
I was getting before you came to the rescue :-) ).


That's annoying, isn't it? I reckon that this is a bug in Access. It
recognises that you have changed one of the fields in the relation but fails
to recognise that you have undone that change.

I have discovered a workaround, and that is to set the cascading updates
property on the relations between Contacts/Individuals and
Contacts/Organisations. That way, Access doesn't whinge when you change the
master side of the relationship - it just updates the foreign key field to
the same value as it had before. Of course, you can't really change the
value of Contacts.ContactTypeID because the constraint in the related table
allows only one valid value.

So... make this change and remove the extra Undo.

By the way, the correct form to use if you want to undo the entire form is:
Me.Undo

Me is already a form object, so Me is equivalent to Me.Form.

The reason you don't want to undo the entire form is that you might have
changed a whole lot of other fields in your Contacts record before
inadvertently changing the contact type. You are then stuck between the
rock and the hard place - either delete the related record and lose all the
indiv/org data, or undo the current record and lose all your changes.

Getting back to the ADO/DAO, my long term aim would be ultimately to
port my little Access program to VB.Net - purely because I'm a sucker
for punishment :-)


You certainly are :-)

this will be a complete rewrite. there is no easy way to convert an Access
app to .Net (or VB6 for that matter).

If I code everything using DAO now, will I need to re-code everything
into ADO later, or does VB.Net not care which one you reference?


I believe you can use the DAO object model from .Net - no reason why not.

On a different tangent, if I port everything over to VB.Net, do you
know if I will need extra licences or if I have to upgrade to a
developer edition of some sort before I can distribute my VB.Net
program with an .mdb file? Will my VB.Net or existing ms office
licences cover this sort of thing (ie distribution)? And what's the
deal with runtime files? Will they be packaged with my .mdb file if I
incorporate that into a VB.Net program?


No, you don't need any licences to open an MDB using .Net or VB6. All you
need is DAO360.DLL, but I'm pretty sure this comes with Windows anyway.

If you buy Visual Studio Tools for Office (VSTO) you get with it the Access
Developer Extensions (ADE) which allows you unlimited licence to distribute
the runtime version of Access, so you can install and run your Access app on
a computer that doesn't have Access (or even Office) installed.

Thanks for letting me pick your brain.


My pleasure :-)
--
Good Luck!

Graham Mandeno [Access MVP]
Auckland, New Zealand


  #34  
Old August 12th, 2006, 09:39 AM posted to microsoft.public.access.tablesdbdesign
Bob
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15
Default How to enforce subtypes/supertypes in Access 2000?

Thanks Graham,

I was a bit worried about Form.Undo myself (for the very reason you warn
against using it) - but it seems that access auto-saves any changes
everytime you move (eg tab) to the next field anyway. So I figured I was
safe or at worst would lose changes only to the current field. Your
solution is, of course, much better. I updated the relationships and
removed the extra undo and everything works. Thanks yet again.

As for porting to VB.Net, the learning curve for Access just seems a little
easier to climb than VB.Net; especially when you have very little spare
time. While I always enjoy pulling my hair out (to the point that I'm sure
I'm experiencing premature balding :-D ), I'm also keen to see some
progress. With Access, I hope to see a working prototype a little sooner.

I was rather hoping that the required runtime files might come with VB.Net
itself. I guess I'll have to invest in a copy of VSTO.

While I still have your attention, I'd like to ask a new question related to
form/subform design. I would like to move all of my contact phone and fax
numbers into a new table (tblTeleComs). I have created a Junction table
tblContactComs to enable a many to many relationship between tblContacts and
tblTeleComs. The table structions for the two new tables are as follows:

tblTeleComs
ComID (pk - autonumber)
ComType [to store text descriptions like "Work Tel" or "Home Tel")
ComNumber

tblContactComs
ContactID (pk - number)
ComID (pk - number)

I've created a new subform (subfrmContactNumbers) which I have set up as a
continuous form. This subform is linked to tblTeleComs.

What I would like to do is have two subforms on my existing main form. I
want my existing subform (NewIndiv/NewOrg) to go on the left, and my new
form to sit immediately to the side of that. This way all phone and fax
numbers will run down the right hand side of the main form. I want to the
user to be able to add new numbers on this form by simply pressing a command
button - and have a new blank row appear immediately below the existing fax
and phone numbers ready for a new number to be inserted. (I hope this is
clear).

Anyway, my problem is that I don't have a ContactID in tblTeleComs so how do
I link the new subform to my main form?



TIA
Bob



"Graham Mandeno" wrote in message
...
Hi Bob

Answers inline...

By the way, I think I found a slight bug in the Before_Update code you
supplied. What I have found is if I try to change the ContactType the
custom error message popups up as expected. If I then opt to delete
the existing record, everything is fine. The record is deleted and I
can still navigate the records using the record selector at the foot of
the main (Clients) form - again everything works as expected. But if I
opt to cancel the update instead, I end up getting the standard Access
message about not being able to change or delete the record (ie the one
I was getting before you came to the rescue :-) ).


That's annoying, isn't it? I reckon that this is a bug in Access. It
recognises that you have changed one of the fields in the relation but
fails to recognise that you have undone that change.

I have discovered a workaround, and that is to set the cascading updates
property on the relations between Contacts/Individuals and
Contacts/Organisations. That way, Access doesn't whinge when you change
the master side of the relationship - it just updates the foreign key
field to the same value as it had before. Of course, you can't really
change the value of Contacts.ContactTypeID because the constraint in the
related table allows only one valid value.

So... make this change and remove the extra Undo.

By the way, the correct form to use if you want to undo the entire form
is:
Me.Undo

Me is already a form object, so Me is equivalent to Me.Form.

The reason you don't want to undo the entire form is that you might have
changed a whole lot of other fields in your Contacts record before
inadvertently changing the contact type. You are then stuck between the
rock and the hard place - either delete the related record and lose all
the indiv/org data, or undo the current record and lose all your changes.

Getting back to the ADO/DAO, my long term aim would be ultimately to
port my little Access program to VB.Net - purely because I'm a sucker
for punishment :-)


You certainly are :-)

this will be a complete rewrite. there is no easy way to convert an
Access app to .Net (or VB6 for that matter).

If I code everything using DAO now, will I need to re-code everything
into ADO later, or does VB.Net not care which one you reference?


I believe you can use the DAO object model from .Net - no reason why not.

On a different tangent, if I port everything over to VB.Net, do you
know if I will need extra licences or if I have to upgrade to a
developer edition of some sort before I can distribute my VB.Net
program with an .mdb file? Will my VB.Net or existing ms office
licences cover this sort of thing (ie distribution)? And what's the
deal with runtime files? Will they be packaged with my .mdb file if I
incorporate that into a VB.Net program?


No, you don't need any licences to open an MDB using .Net or VB6. All you
need is DAO360.DLL, but I'm pretty sure this comes with Windows anyway.

If you buy Visual Studio Tools for Office (VSTO) you get with it the
Access Developer Extensions (ADE) which allows you unlimited licence to
distribute the runtime version of Access, so you can install and run your
Access app on a computer that doesn't have Access (or even Office)
installed.

Thanks for letting me pick your brain.


My pleasure :-)
--
Good Luck!

Graham Mandeno [Access MVP]
Auckland, New Zealand




  #35  
Old August 12th, 2006, 11:17 AM posted to microsoft.public.access.tablesdbdesign
Bob
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15
Default How to enforce subtypes/supertypes in Access 2000?

Hi Graham,

Don't trouble yourself with my last query. I got access to create a new
form using my junction and TeleComs table and then used the resulting form
as my source for the subform control in my main form. This achieves what I
want except that the control does not automatically resize to enable all
records in the subform to be seen. Is there a way to do this?


Regards
Bob



"Bob" wrote in message
...
Thanks Graham,

I was a bit worried about Form.Undo myself (for the very reason you warn
against using it) - but it seems that access auto-saves any changes
everytime you move (eg tab) to the next field anyway. So I figured I was
safe or at worst would lose changes only to the current field. Your
solution is, of course, much better. I updated the relationships and
removed the extra undo and everything works. Thanks yet again.

As for porting to VB.Net, the learning curve for Access just seems a
little easier to climb than VB.Net; especially when you have very little
spare time. While I always enjoy pulling my hair out (to the point that
I'm sure I'm experiencing premature balding :-D ), I'm also keen to see
some progress. With Access, I hope to see a working prototype a little
sooner.

I was rather hoping that the required runtime files might come with VB.Net
itself. I guess I'll have to invest in a copy of VSTO.

While I still have your attention, I'd like to ask a new question related
to form/subform design. I would like to move all of my contact phone and
fax numbers into a new table (tblTeleComs). I have created a Junction
table tblContactComs to enable a many to many relationship between
tblContacts and tblTeleComs. The table structions for the two new tables
are as follows:

tblTeleComs
ComID (pk - autonumber)
ComType [to store text descriptions like "Work Tel" or "Home Tel")
ComNumber

tblContactComs
ContactID (pk - number)
ComID (pk - number)

I've created a new subform (subfrmContactNumbers) which I have set up as a
continuous form. This subform is linked to tblTeleComs.

What I would like to do is have two subforms on my existing main form. I
want my existing subform (NewIndiv/NewOrg) to go on the left, and my new
form to sit immediately to the side of that. This way all phone and fax
numbers will run down the right hand side of the main form. I want to the
user to be able to add new numbers on this form by simply pressing a
command button - and have a new blank row appear immediately below the
existing fax and phone numbers ready for a new number to be inserted. (I
hope this is clear).

Anyway, my problem is that I don't have a ContactID in tblTeleComs so how
do I link the new subform to my main form?



TIA
Bob



"Graham Mandeno" wrote in message
...
Hi Bob

Answers inline...

By the way, I think I found a slight bug in the Before_Update code you
supplied. What I have found is if I try to change the ContactType the
custom error message popups up as expected. If I then opt to delete
the existing record, everything is fine. The record is deleted and I
can still navigate the records using the record selector at the foot of
the main (Clients) form - again everything works as expected. But if I
opt to cancel the update instead, I end up getting the standard Access
message about not being able to change or delete the record (ie the one
I was getting before you came to the rescue :-) ).


That's annoying, isn't it? I reckon that this is a bug in Access. It
recognises that you have changed one of the fields in the relation but
fails to recognise that you have undone that change.

I have discovered a workaround, and that is to set the cascading updates
property on the relations between Contacts/Individuals and
Contacts/Organisations. That way, Access doesn't whinge when you change
the master side of the relationship - it just updates the foreign key
field to the same value as it had before. Of course, you can't really
change the value of Contacts.ContactTypeID because the constraint in the
related table allows only one valid value.

So... make this change and remove the extra Undo.

By the way, the correct form to use if you want to undo the entire form
is:
Me.Undo

Me is already a form object, so Me is equivalent to Me.Form.

The reason you don't want to undo the entire form is that you might have
changed a whole lot of other fields in your Contacts record before
inadvertently changing the contact type. You are then stuck between the
rock and the hard place - either delete the related record and lose all
the indiv/org data, or undo the current record and lose all your changes.

Getting back to the ADO/DAO, my long term aim would be ultimately to
port my little Access program to VB.Net - purely because I'm a sucker
for punishment :-)


You certainly are :-)

this will be a complete rewrite. there is no easy way to convert an
Access app to .Net (or VB6 for that matter).

If I code everything using DAO now, will I need to re-code everything
into ADO later, or does VB.Net not care which one you reference?


I believe you can use the DAO object model from .Net - no reason why not.

On a different tangent, if I port everything over to VB.Net, do you
know if I will need extra licences or if I have to upgrade to a
developer edition of some sort before I can distribute my VB.Net
program with an .mdb file? Will my VB.Net or existing ms office
licences cover this sort of thing (ie distribution)? And what's the
deal with runtime files? Will they be packaged with my .mdb file if I
incorporate that into a VB.Net program?


No, you don't need any licences to open an MDB using .Net or VB6. All
you need is DAO360.DLL, but I'm pretty sure this comes with Windows
anyway.

If you buy Visual Studio Tools for Office (VSTO) you get with it the
Access Developer Extensions (ADE) which allows you unlimited licence to
distribute the runtime version of Access, so you can install and run your
Access app on a computer that doesn't have Access (or even Office)
installed.

Thanks for letting me pick your brain.


My pleasure :-)
--
Good Luck!

Graham Mandeno [Access MVP]
Auckland, New Zealand






  #36  
Old August 13th, 2006, 10:16 PM posted to microsoft.public.access.tablesdbdesign
Graham Mandeno
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 593
Default How to enforce subtypes/supertypes in Access 2000?

Hi Bob

No doubt you worked out that you should base your subform's recordsource,
not on tblTeleComs, but on a query comprising both tblTeleComs AND
tblContactComs. That way you have a ContactID in your recordsource to be
the link child field.

The total height required by a form may be calculated as follows:

(height of detail section * number of records) + height of header and
footer (if present)

In VBS terms:

Public Function FormHeightRequired(frm as Form) as Long
Dim lHeight as Long
With frm
.RecordsetClone.MoveLast
lHeight = .Section(acDetail).Height * .RecordsetClone.RecordCount
On Error Resume Next
' in case no header/footer
lHeight = lHeight + .Section(acHeader).Height +
..Section(acFooter).Height
FormHeightRequired = lHeight
End With
End Function

You can call this in the Current event proc of your main form to set the
height of the subform.

With Me.[SubformControl]
.Height = FormHeightRequired(.Form) + some constant
End With

The some constant is an extra bit you will have to fiddle with to
accommodate the subform control's border. Start with about 30.

You probably want to specify a limit, in case the required space is not
available. In this case, you can turn on a vertical scrollbar for the
subform:

.Form.ScrollBars = 2 ' vertical only

or, if there is enough space:

.Form.ScrollBars = 0 ' no scrollbars

--
Good Luck!

Graham Mandeno [Access MVP]
Auckland, New Zealand

"Bob" wrote in message
...
Hi Graham,

Don't trouble yourself with my last query. I got access to create a new
form using my junction and TeleComs table and then used the resulting form
as my source for the subform control in my main form. This achieves what
I want except that the control does not automatically resize to enable all
records in the subform to be seen. Is there a way to do this?


Regards
Bob



"Bob" wrote in message
...
Thanks Graham,

I was a bit worried about Form.Undo myself (for the very reason you warn
against using it) - but it seems that access auto-saves any changes
everytime you move (eg tab) to the next field anyway. So I figured I was
safe or at worst would lose changes only to the current field. Your
solution is, of course, much better. I updated the relationships and
removed the extra undo and everything works. Thanks yet again.

As for porting to VB.Net, the learning curve for Access just seems a
little easier to climb than VB.Net; especially when you have very little
spare time. While I always enjoy pulling my hair out (to the point that
I'm sure I'm experiencing premature balding :-D ), I'm also keen to see
some progress. With Access, I hope to see a working prototype a little
sooner.

I was rather hoping that the required runtime files might come with
VB.Net itself. I guess I'll have to invest in a copy of VSTO.

While I still have your attention, I'd like to ask a new question related
to form/subform design. I would like to move all of my contact phone and
fax numbers into a new table (tblTeleComs). I have created a Junction
table tblContactComs to enable a many to many relationship between
tblContacts and tblTeleComs. The table structions for the two new tables
are as follows:

tblTeleComs
ComID (pk - autonumber)
ComType [to store text descriptions like "Work Tel" or "Home Tel")
ComNumber

tblContactComs
ContactID (pk - number)
ComID (pk - number)

I've created a new subform (subfrmContactNumbers) which I have set up as
a continuous form. This subform is linked to tblTeleComs.

What I would like to do is have two subforms on my existing main form. I
want my existing subform (NewIndiv/NewOrg) to go on the left, and my new
form to sit immediately to the side of that. This way all phone and fax
numbers will run down the right hand side of the main form. I want to
the user to be able to add new numbers on this form by simply pressing a
command button - and have a new blank row appear immediately below the
existing fax and phone numbers ready for a new number to be inserted.
(I hope this is clear).

Anyway, my problem is that I don't have a ContactID in tblTeleComs so how
do I link the new subform to my main form?



TIA
Bob



"Graham Mandeno" wrote in message
...
Hi Bob

Answers inline...

By the way, I think I found a slight bug in the Before_Update code you
supplied. What I have found is if I try to change the ContactType the
custom error message popups up as expected. If I then opt to delete
the existing record, everything is fine. The record is deleted and I
can still navigate the records using the record selector at the foot of
the main (Clients) form - again everything works as expected. But if I
opt to cancel the update instead, I end up getting the standard Access
message about not being able to change or delete the record (ie the one
I was getting before you came to the rescue :-) ).

That's annoying, isn't it? I reckon that this is a bug in Access. It
recognises that you have changed one of the fields in the relation but
fails to recognise that you have undone that change.

I have discovered a workaround, and that is to set the cascading updates
property on the relations between Contacts/Individuals and
Contacts/Organisations. That way, Access doesn't whinge when you change
the master side of the relationship - it just updates the foreign key
field to the same value as it had before. Of course, you can't really
change the value of Contacts.ContactTypeID because the constraint in the
related table allows only one valid value.

So... make this change and remove the extra Undo.

By the way, the correct form to use if you want to undo the entire form
is:
Me.Undo

Me is already a form object, so Me is equivalent to Me.Form.

The reason you don't want to undo the entire form is that you might have
changed a whole lot of other fields in your Contacts record before
inadvertently changing the contact type. You are then stuck between the
rock and the hard place - either delete the related record and lose all
the indiv/org data, or undo the current record and lose all your
changes.

Getting back to the ADO/DAO, my long term aim would be ultimately to
port my little Access program to VB.Net - purely because I'm a sucker
for punishment :-)

You certainly are :-)

this will be a complete rewrite. there is no easy way to convert an
Access app to .Net (or VB6 for that matter).

If I code everything using DAO now, will I need to re-code everything
into ADO later, or does VB.Net not care which one you reference?

I believe you can use the DAO object model from .Net - no reason why
not.

On a different tangent, if I port everything over to VB.Net, do you
know if I will need extra licences or if I have to upgrade to a
developer edition of some sort before I can distribute my VB.Net
program with an .mdb file? Will my VB.Net or existing ms office
licences cover this sort of thing (ie distribution)? And what's the
deal with runtime files? Will they be packaged with my .mdb file if I
incorporate that into a VB.Net program?

No, you don't need any licences to open an MDB using .Net or VB6. All
you need is DAO360.DLL, but I'm pretty sure this comes with Windows
anyway.

If you buy Visual Studio Tools for Office (VSTO) you get with it the
Access Developer Extensions (ADE) which allows you unlimited licence to
distribute the runtime version of Access, so you can install and run
your Access app on a computer that doesn't have Access (or even Office)
installed.

Thanks for letting me pick your brain.

My pleasure :-)
--
Good Luck!

Graham Mandeno [Access MVP]
Auckland, New Zealand








  #37  
Old August 14th, 2006, 03:39 AM posted to microsoft.public.access.tablesdbdesign
Graham Mandeno
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 593
Default How to enforce subtypes/supertypes in Access 2000?

Oh, by the way... I thought you might like to know that your first email
just arrived this morning.

God knows where it's been! :-)

--
Cheers,
Graham


  #38  
Old August 14th, 2006, 09:06 PM posted to microsoft.public.access.tablesdbdesign
Bob
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15
Default How to enforce subtypes/supertypes in Access 2000?

I guess snail mail has gone electronic :-D

Regards
Bob

"Graham Mandeno" wrote in message
...
Oh, by the way... I thought you might like to know that your first email
just arrived this morning.

God knows where it's been! :-)

--
Cheers,
Graham



 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 OfficeFrustration.
The comments are property of their posters.